planet.webcompat.com

otsukare by Karl Dubost at

From the seventh floor, I see the cheminey of a local sento. It's not always on. The smoke is not coming out, it gives me a good visual feedback of the opening hours. It's here. It doesn't have notifications. It doesn't have ics, atom. It's just there. And it's fine as-is. The digital world seems sometimes to create complicated UI and UX over things which are just working. They become disruptive but not helpful.

Tune of the week: Leo Ferré - Avec le temps

Webcompat Life

Progress this week:

Today: 2016-08-22T13:46:36.150030
300 open issues
----------------------
needsinfo       4
needsdiagnosis  86
needscontact    18
contactready    28
sitewait        156
----------------------

You are welcome to participate

Webcompat issues

(a selection of some of the bugs worked on this week).

WebCompat.com dev

Reading List

  • Return of the 10kB Web design contest. Good stuff. I spend a good chunk of my time in the network panel of devtools… And it's horrific.

Follow Your Nose

TODO

  • Document how to write tests on webcompat.com using test fixtures.
  • ToWrite: Amazon prefetching resources with <object> for Firefox only.

Otsukare!

otsukare by Karl Dubost at

Cicadas are an interesting insect. They live most of their time as a nymph under the ground in between 2 and 5 years, but some species live until 17 years before coming out and die six weeks after. What does it tell us about all the hidden work we put during our lifetime and blooms and shines for only a couple of hours.

Tune of the week: Ella Fitzgerald - Summertime (1968)

Webcompat Life

Progress this week:

Today: 2016-08-15T08:58:55.633182
298 open issues
----------------------
needsinfo       4
needsdiagnosis  80
needscontact    17
contactready    29
sitewait        158
----------------------

You are welcome to participate

Webcompat issues

(a selection of some of the bugs worked on this week).

  • Gecko and Blink/WebKit have different default CSS border-width values for the input element. It breaks a site. If we decide to fix it in Gecko, do we break other sites relying on this default value?
  • Performance issues on a heavy map Web site, though I'm not sure it is really a Web compatibility issue. It looks like more of something related to Gecko.
  • Another issue related to layout with a content inside a form. I need to dig a bit more.
  • no tap on priceline
  • Use chrome only for transcribeme
  • When using element.removeEventListener('event', callback) never forgets the second argument because it fails in Firefox, though that seems to be working in Chrome.
  • mask, background and mask-image difference creates immaterial design. The most important now being to really find what is the source of the issue.

WebCompat.com dev

  • Is invalid always the right keyword for closing an issue? From our side (project owner) it is invalid because it is not in the scope of the project, or there isn't enough details to reproduce. But from the user's perspective who had genuinely an issue (whatever the issue is), it can be felt as a strong rejection along the lines of "We don't care about you". Maybe we should find a better way of closing issues when they are out of scope.

Reading List

  • More a quote of the day, but spot on: > Wondering how long it will take for publishers to realize it’s Medium that desperately needs them and not the other way around.
  • And another one from Adam. And I really wish we could do that in a cool way! > <adam_s> Almost at our 3000th bug on webcompat.com. The lucky reporter who hits 3000 wins a broken light bulb

Follow Your Nose

TODO

  • Document how to write tests on webcompat.com using test fixtures.
  • ToWrite: Amazon prefetching resources with <object> for Firefox only.

Otsukare!

otsukare by Karl Dubost at

Tune of the week: Patti LaBelle - Somewhere Over the Rainbow

Webcompat Life

Progress this week:

Today: 2016-08-08T08:22:45.867497
283 open issues
----------------------
needsinfo       5
needsdiagnosis  62
needscontact    16
contactready    29
sitewait        157
----------------------

You are welcome to participate

We had a Web compat meeting this week and we welcomed a new team member: Dennis Schubert.

Webcompat issues

(a selection of some of the bugs worked on this week).

  • WebKit css for hiding/showing the menu bar on a responsive layout, it will be solved on Firefox 49
  • Almost every week, we are adding issues to the HLS/M3U8 bug. That's the top report we currently get on webcompat.
  • Yet another example that any hacks will break in the future. On this bug, the links are not working in Firefox. A strange rule x:-moz-any-link, x:default was applied to the CSS. This was ignored by other browsers. It seems it is a Firefox 3.0 hack which is widely distributed through sites like CSS Tricks. They also do strange things when using select.
  • WebP support in mod_pagespeed is full of user agent sniffing. I followed the trail of different updates. And because this specific Web site probably relies on an older version of mod_pagespeed it breaks in Firefox Android. The irony is that it will probably break in the future if finally WebP is supported by Gecko.
  • Some outreach contact leads are very hard to find. If you know someone working for SMASH or FujiRock festival, please tell me.
  • Funky issues with a JavaScript for cutting out text through canvas which doesn't work currently in Firefox.
  • We have a recurring issue with a newsletter/sweepstake web site. I haven't nailed down what was happening.

WebCompat.com dev

Reading List

Follow Your Nose

TODO

  • Document how to write tests on webcompat.com using test fixtures.
  • ToWrite: Amazon prefetching resources with <object> for Firefox only.

Otsukare!

otsukare by Karl Dubost at

Tune of the week: Rico Loop in One Shot because it's what we basically do on a daily basis on the Web. Remixing tools, code and knowledge when we encounter them along our way to create and solve issues. The last two weeks I have been staying at the seventh floor, it offers new perspectives on the work and the mind.

Webcompat Life

Progress this week:

Today: 2016-08-01T07:10:39.302548
294 open issues
----------------------
needsinfo       5
needsdiagnosis  70
needscontact    16
contactready    33
sitewait        165
----------------------

You are welcome to participate

And you would think that there is no issue with the way create their scripts. function openBrowser(). They could have just simply named it: function openChromeMonoculture().

Webcompat issues

(a selection of some of the bugs worked on this week).

  • A string of issues with Bank of America. As usual it's a bit frustrating given that when faking the Chrome User Agent, we get a better user experience than with the bare Firefox User Agent, which in turns is silly because each time we fake the UA, we end up reducing the stats of Firefox into the global site market share, which… makes it impossible for Firefox to become parts of the supported browsers. Chicken and egg.
    • Bug 1280834 Bank of America recommends other browsers on OSX. (also webc 2787
    • Bug 784463 - Firefox Android receives Desktop site instead of mobile site
  • Canadian Tire is another hard issue to crack. Maybe we should associate webcompat.com to Pokémon Go and have users collect bugs in all Canadian Tire bugs.
  • Interesting issue on linkedin layout with a combination of table CSS layout which doesn't seem to behave the same in Chrome and Firefox.
  • There is a redirection issue in between Firefox and Chrome using HTTP 302 to capture the location and opening the appropriate app. In this case it's between Calendar and Hangout. It seems less than ideal when the non standard `intent://`` was used for this in the past.
  • On this one, we receive on Firefox Android a WebP image (WebP is not supported yet in Firefox) instead of jpeg. Maybe there is something related to the optimization rules of pagespeed.

WebCompat.com dev

Reading List

Follow Your Nose

TODO

  • Document how to write tests on webcompat.com using test fixtures.
  • ToWrite: Amazon prefetching resources with <object> for Firefox only.

Otsukare!

otsukare by Karl Dubost at

Each time I "set up my office" (moved to a new place for the next 3 months, construction work on the main home), I'm mesmerized by how easy it is to set up a work environment. Laptop, wifi and electricity are the main things needed to start. A table and a chair are useful but non essential. And eventually an additional screen to have more working surface to be comfortable. Basically in 5 minutes we are ready to work. And that's one chance of our area of work. How long does it take before you can start working?

Working with a view on Enoshima for the next 3 months. Tune of the week: Omoide no Enoshima.

Webcompat Life

Progress this week:

Today: 2016-07-25T06:21:33.702789
296 open issues
----------------------
needsinfo       5
needsdiagnosis  71
needscontact    14
contactready    34
sitewait        164
----------------------

You are welcome to participate

Webcompat issues

(a selection of some of the bugs worked on this week).

  • Time to time, people are reporting usability issues which are more or less cross-browsers. They basically hinder every browsers. It's out scope for the Web Compatibility project, but hint at something interesting about browsers and users perception. Often, I wonder if browsers should do more than just supporting the legacy Web site (aka it displays), but also adjust the content to a more palatable experience. Somehow the way, Reader mode is doing on user request, a beautify button for legacy content.
  • Google Image Search and black arrow. A kind of cubist arrow for Firefox. Modern design?
  • I opened an issue on Tracking Protection and Webcompat. Adam pointed me this morning to a project on moving tracking protection to a Web extension.
  • Because we have more issues on Firefox Desktop and Firefox Android, we focus our energy there, so we need someone in the community to focus on Firefox OS issues.
  • When I test Web sites on Firefox Android, I usually do it through the remote debugging in WebIDE and instead of typing a long URI on the device itself, I usually go to the console and paste the address I want window.location = 'http://example.com/long/path/with/strange/356374389dgjlkj36s'.
  • Starting to test a bit more in depth what appearance means in different browsers. Specifically to determine what is needed for Web compatibility and/or Web standards.
  • a WONTFIX which is a good news. Bug 1231829 - Implement -webkit-border-image quirks for compatibility. It means it has been fixed by the site owners.
  • On this Find my phone issue on Google search, the wrong order of CSS properties creates a layout issue where the XUL -moz-box was finally interpreted, but it triggered a good question from Xidorn. Should we expose the XUL display values to Web content? Add to that that some properties in the CSS never existed.
  • hangout doesn't work the same way for Chrome and Firefox. There's something happening either on the Chrome side or the servers, which creates the right path of actions. I haven't determined it yet.

WebCompat.com dev

Reading List

Follow Your Nose

TODO

  • Document how to write tests on webcompat.com using test fixtures.
  • ToWrite: Amazon prefetching resources with <object> for Firefox only.

Otsukare!

Adam Stevenson's Blog by Adam Stevenson at

I’ve been trying to learn more about how screenshots can help us identify compatibility issues in Firefox. It started with the question:

How does Firefox compare to Chrome in the top 100 websites?

Pretty good it turns out, on the front pages at least, you can view them yourself [Some images are offensive and NSFW]. You can also check out the same list of sites but comparing Firefox to Firefox with tracking protection. I made some scripts to capture the screens in OSX. They make use of the screencapture utility and this other cool little utility called GetWindowID. GetWindowID determines which Window ID is associated to a program on the screen, Firefox or Chrome in this case.

Let’s look at how these utilities work together.

Running the GetWindowID command requires that we specify which program we are looking for and which tab is active as well. I’ve made sure that my version of Firefox starts up with the Mozilla Firefox Start Page. If we execute this command:

./GetWindowID "Firefox" "Mozilla Firefox Start Page";

It returns a numeric value like:
1072

This is great because the screencapture utility needs to know which window ID to look at.
So let’s take that same GetWindowID command from earlier and store the result into a variable called ‘gcwindow’.

gcwindow=$(./GetWindowID "Firefox" "Mozilla Firefox Start Page");

Now gcwindow has the value 1072 from before. Let’s feed that into the screencapture utility:

screencapture -t jpg -T 40 -l $gcwindow -x ~/Desktop/screens/firefoxtest/$site.jpg;

When this runs the program will wait 40 seconds from the "-T 40” parameter then take a screenshot of Window ID 1072, which is our Firefox instance. The JPG file will be stored in a folder on my desktop under screens/firefoxtest. The rest of the script is looping through each website name that we’ve entered, opening a new browser window, opening the website we want to capture, killing the browser process after each screenshot and some sleep commands in between that give the computer time to execute each step.

There are some browser preferences and considerations that you will want to be aware of before running these scripts.

Why do all this in OSX? Cause I like to work on a mac, I guess. OK I don’t have a good reason but if you want to make it work on a Linux docker or something cool that’d be super sweet. The other thing to keep in mind is I’m looking at viewport screenshots right now, full page would be nice, but we’ll get there.

So the side by side comparison of popular sites is pretty useful but looking at things is a lot of work. It would be cool if we could automate some or all of that looking, right? Luckily there are image comparison tools that can help with this. I decided to try out Yahoo’s blink-diff tool which is built using node.js.

First off only PNG’s are supported with this tool, but that’s easy to change using the screencapture command line tool.

So we use 'screencapture -t png’ instead of 'screencapture -t jpg’.

Let’s go through setting this up for a single test. You’ll need to have node.js installed first.
We need to create a new folder, the name isn’t important.

mkdir onetime-diff

Then download this javascript file from Github and put it in that folder. Now let’s initialize our project:

npm init

And just accept all the defaults. Next let’s install the dependancies:

npm install blink-diff
npm install pngjs-image

Great, it’s ready to run now. The index.js file we downloaded looks for two files in the same folder called firefox.png and chrome.png and will generate a file called output.png. If you need a couple files to test with:

firefox.png
chrome.png

Note that if you provide your own PNG files, you may need to adjust the cropping parameters. I’ve configured the script to work best for Firefox and Chrome screenshots captured on a retina display, if you aren’t using a retina display divide those numbers by 2. You can see here y:160 and y:144, this is cropping out the top portion of the screenshot where the browser's “chrome” is.

cropImageA: { x:0, y:160, width:0, height:0 }, // Firefox
cropImageB: { x:0, y:144, width:0, height:0 }, // Chrome

Once you’re ready to run the test, execute:

node index.js

After a minute, it should generate an output.png file that looks like this and the script will return a result to the command prompt:

Passed
Found 1116908 differences.

So this is a good start, we have an image comparison program and an automated screenshot utility. To make it more useful I created another script that combines these together. On a high level it works like this:

First site > Screenshot Firefox > Screenshot Chrome > Compare images in background process > Next Site...

It has the same dependancies as before, but now we run it like this:

./start.sh

After giving this is a few runs and playing with the settings, I started to see some issues.

  • Advertisements placed in different positions, sizes, style or even amount
  • Regional site redirects
  • Different home page, providing a ‘fresh look’ or they are A/B testing
  • Site surveys or other pop ups
  • Large image sliders
  • Random overlay pop up ads
  • Rotating background images
  • Very slow process when using one computer

We want each site to have a decent amount of time to load, I normally use between 30-40 seconds. But that adds up over 1000 or more sites. I decided to hack something basic together to allow multiple computers in my house to split the load. It helps but it would be much better to have this running on Linux virtual machines or dockers.

So what’s next?

  • More sample runs to find a decent set of parameters for the baseline
  • Identifying in the top 1000 sites, which ones will continue to fail
  • Can we set higher thresholds and still detect when something breaks?
  • Can the tool ignore areas that are constantly changing?
  • Get the results out in the open for others to look at

If any of this interests you and want to get involved, I’d love to hear from you. Or if you have advice on how to make this better, please reach out as well.

otsukare by Karl Dubost at

Tracking protection is an interesting beast. A feature to help users but users think the site is broken. I guess it's something similar to habits. If you put a mask on your face and you have forgotten about it, you may be surprised that people do not want to talk to you.

Webcompat Life

Progress this week:

Today: 2016-07-19T11:32:54.030052
316 open issues
----------------------
needsinfo       5
needsdiagnosis  76
needscontact    20
contactready    41
sitewait        168
----------------------

You are welcome to participate

Webcompat issues

(a selection of some of the bugs worked on this week).

  • issue with MLB site displaying the plays.
  • Interesting CSS issue about display:table and max-height having a different behavior in Chrome and Firefox, maybe something related to a known issue. To be confirmed.
  • Enabling Tracking Protection in Firefox creates a lot of issues, which are not completely understood by users. We are starting to have a set of Web Compatibility reports because the site breaks or crashes when tracking protection is enabled. Usually, the JavaScript code of the site didn't take into account that some people might want to block some of the page assets, and this creates unintended consequences. There is probably something around UX to improve here. So users really understand their choices.

WebCompat.com dev

Reading List

  • CSS Containment.

    the contain property, which indicates that the element’s subtree is independent of the rest of the page.

    If I understand, this seems like something which would answer many of the complaints we hear from Web developers about CSS isolation. Specifically the layout term: contain: layout.

    This value turns on layout containment for the element. This ensures that the containing element is totally opaque for layout purposes; nothing outside can affect its internal layout, and vice versa.

    Implemented in Blink. I didn't find an issue on WebKit project (Safari). I didn't find a bug in Mozilla Bugzilla either. Can I use?. Probably no.

Follow Your Nose

TODO

  • Document how to write tests on webcompat.com using test fixtures.
  • ToWrite: Amazon prefetching resources with <object> for Firefox only.

Otsukare!

otsukare by Karl Dubost at

Summer in its full heat has started in Japan. I'll follow the sun, Beatles.

Webcompat Life

Progress this week:

Today: 2016-07-11T09:55:26.360775
346 open issues
----------------------
needsinfo       5
needsdiagnosis  74
needscontact    33
contactready    50
sitewait        165
----------------------

You are welcome to participate

We had a short team meeting.

Webcompat issues

(a selection of some of the bugs worked on this week).

  • offsetWidth creates issue on this site. Hallvord may have found the origin of the issue. It would require a test case to show the differences in between Blink, Edge and Gecko to be extra-sure. The definition of offsetWidth in Gecko: NS_IMETHOD GetOffsetWidth(int32_t *aOffsetWidth) = 0; which leads to OffsetWidth() BUT Daniel found the culprit. This is fixed in Aurora and Nightly so will be soon working on production releases.
  • Google Search and Firefox Android (when faking the user agent to be Chrome) is giving an almost working site. There's only one issue when requesting images on the tab. Almost there. Note that this is already working in Firefox Nightly because of the implementation of some WebKit properties.

WebCompat.com dev

  • I finally came around fixing a "bug" when rewriting Link headers I had introduced in webcompat.com and that one of our interns discovered when solving another issue.
  • Fixed our contributions guidelines to be a bit stricter on the Pull Request review policy. Summary: You should not merge if you are the pull request submitter and the pull request needs an r+ before expecting to move forward.
  • Started to work on a logging feature for webcompat.com to detect potential abuse of the service. For now, let's not over-engineer it and make it very simple. It requires the service for log rotation and keep only the last two weeks, and the actual logging in Flask, and also a change of policy.
  • Also trying to make a bit more square the repo for issue parsing so that external people can participate. This is in progress.
  • When interacting a lot with GitHub, I was thinking it would be nice to have an up-to-date mocking python module of GitHub API. Maybe that could be done by parsing the API documentation and extracting the tables and responses and then creating the mocking service. Just food for thoughts. Even better would be github giving a JSON file describing all routes, HTTP codes, and responses.

Reading List

  • Rust and Rest. Replace REST by HTTP in that article and it's a nice read.

Follow Your Nose

TODO

  • Document how to write tests on webcompat.com using test fixtures.
  • ToWrite: Amazon prefetching resources with <object> for Firefox only.

Otsukare!

Adam Stevenson's Blog by Adam Stevenson at

Recently a bug was reported for the Bank of America (BOA) website. The problem is that BOA is alerting Firefox users on OSX that the site may not work for the browser they are using. We have a really nice contact at BOA so I reached out this morning to find out what’s up. He said that Firefox for OSX has dipped below 1% of their overall traffic. They have a policy that any browser with this low of traffic is not officially supported.

Some random questions came to my head while I scratched it:

OK, so what about Firefox on Windows? Yep that’s supported.
Is Chrome OSX supported? Yeah, obvi.
What could be different between Windows and OSX Firefox versions? Not much.
What does Officially Supported mean? Now we’re getting deep.
Does it require more testing for QA? Probably not, if it works in Windows.
What about customer service? Well they already support browsers in OSX and they know how Firefox works.
Do they prevent Firefox OSX from using the site? Nah.
Will users see that alert as a reason to use another browser, assuming Firefox is less secure? My brain hurts.

At the end of the day Firefox in OSX will continue to work fine on this website, but users will be nagged at every visit. Not a great experience and not great for the web. Let's hope that they reconsider this policy over time.

otsukare by Karl Dubost at

In France, in the forest, listening to the sound of leaves on oak trees, in between bugs and preparing for London work week. Tune of the week: Working Class Hero.

Webcompat Life

Progress this week:

Today: 2016-06-14T06:14:05.461238
338 open issues
----------------------
needsinfo       4
needsdiagnosis  92
needscontact    23
contactready    46
sitewait        161
----------------------

You are welcome to participate

London agenda.

Webcompat issues

(a selection of some of the bugs worked on this week).

WebCompat.com dev

  • I'm wondering if we are not missing a step once we have contacted a Web site.

Reading List

Follow Your Nose

TODO

  • Document how to write tests on webcompat.com using test fixtures.
  • ToWrite: Amazon prefetching resources with <object> for Firefox only.

Otsukare!

otsukare by Karl Dubost at

In November 2015, at W3C TPAC in Sapporo, I asked to annoyed representatives of Google, about the new shiny AMP.

What's in it for Google?

I received a canned meaningless answer about making the Web better. 7 months later. We got the answer.

Ads on AMP: Where Faster is Better When the AMP team set out to help make mobile experiences great for everybody, the objective wasn’t just to improve a user’s engagement with content. We knew the experience people had with ads was equally important to help publishers fund the great content we all love to read.

Oh the irony of this world.

Otsukare!

otsukare by Karl Dubost at

There is a "discussion" going on about Progressive Web Apps and the user experience currently provided by Flipkart.

If they are not sure the site is not fully working on a browser X, they block it through user agent sniffing. It is a double fail strategy.

  1. User Agent sniffing is often a fail strategy. It can be bypassed through user agent override, which as browser vendors we often do to provide users the access they deserve. It's a silly game if you think about it. The Web site blocks the browser. The browser vendor does UA override for this site. The site doesn't record statistics of customers with this browser. So no understanding if they really have, even if tiny, a market share there.
  2. Blocking users is just bad for your brand. It means "Hey you, we don't accept your choices. You are not welcome in our place". It's violent. It's a lack of respect.

A path in between? Managing user expectations.

Create your Web site in a way which gives universal access, what is called progressive Web. It works in the simplest environment and offers a better experience for users with different type of choices.

But if you really have to prioritize your work, then just say it, inform the user once, that this site has been fully checked on these platforms X, Y and Z and it might fail in some areas. That you welcome bug reports explaining in which ways it fails and that you are interested by receiving some hints on how to fix it. This is thousand times better than blocking a user.

Otsukare!

otsukare by Karl Dubost at

A couple of days ago, I collected the blog posts about Progressive Web Apps (PWA). This morning I was reading a new blog post by Alex Russel about the user experience related to the add to home screen. There's one thing which I would welcome in the user experience: The silo'ed PWA.

Intimacies

One thing which regularly frustrates me with the Web sites are trackers, and more specifically trackers across Web sites. My browser is a set of intimacies, a whole me which is rightly connected in my physical embodiment. I never close the browser, except for upgrades. I have 273 tabs (right now) opened. And I use uBlock and uMatrix heavily by blocking everything by default and allowing things on a resource by resource case. The reason apart of performances is to silo my individual intimacies from the outside. To make the choice to share your personal data with one site is a thing, to give a blank check to reveal your intimacies across sites is another one.

Silo'ed PWA

I can see a sweet spot for Progressive Web Apps as a silo for the relationship you decide to establish with this Web site. I really dislike centralized silos when it's about big deep pits of communications such as Facebook, twitter, and so on, but I praise for the silos you create for yourself. I may decide to share my data with this Web site, because I trust it, because I decided I can live with it.

What about having an option on the browser to always add my home screen in a private tab-like environment? Here I would feel a bit more respect for our individual complexities and diversities.

PS: It also could be a nice feature in browser tabs.

Otsukare!

otsukare by Karl Dubost at

Traveling from Japan to France early on with family, a toddler, and 8 hours of flight delay on an already 12 hours long flight is tough. So light week. At least the tsuyu season in Japan will be avoided. Next-next week London meeting, then a bit of holidays in Normandy.

Tune of the week: Singing In The Rain

Webcompat Life

Progress this week:

Today: 2016-06-06T06:52:30.312973
356 open issues
----------------------
needsinfo       3
needsdiagnosis  109
needscontact    22
contactready    44
sitewait        163
----------------------

I need to improve this script generating the summary. Specifically I need to highlight each browser manufacturers.

We also receive a lot of spams lately on webcompat.com. This is not good. Is it a mark of success of the project.

You are welcome to participate

London agenda.

Webcompat issues

(a selection of some of the bugs worked on this week).

WebCompat.com dev

Reading List

  • CSS When/Else Rules: "A proposal to extend the concept of CSS conditional rules to arbitrary when/else chains, and supporing this, a proposal to unify the disparate conditional rules into a single grammar."

Follow Your Nose

TODO

  • Document how to write tests on webcompat.com using test fixtures.
  • ToWrite: Amazon prefetching resources with <object> for Firefox only.

Otsukare!

otsukare by Karl Dubost at

PWA stands for Progressive Web Apps. In French, it sounds like "Pouah!"" which could be roughly translated to "Yuck!". That in itself could be a good summary of these last few days.

No URLs has been harmed during this compilation (apart of one person who posted on medium, if you care about URLs, don't post on medium). I'm just keeping the list around to remember the context.

15 June 2015

Note the year… 2015

Progressive Web Apps: Escaping Tabs Without Losing Our Soul, Alex Russel:

URLs and links as the core organizing system: if you can’t link to it, it isn’t part of the web

18 March 2016

Progressive web apps: the long game, Remy Sharp:

TL;DR: There's a high barrier of entry to add to home screen that will create a trust between our users and our web apps. A trust that equals the trust of an app store installed app. This is huge.

23 May 2016

@adactio, Jeremy Keith:

Strongly disagree with Lighthouse wanting “Manifest's display property set to standalone/fullscreen to allow launching without address bar.”

24 May 2016

Regressive Web Apps, Jeremy Keith:

Chrome developers have decided that displaying URLs is not “best practice”. It was filed as a bug.

On URLs in Progressive Web Apps, Bruce Lawson:

What do you think? How can we best allow the user to see the current URL in a discoverable way?

25 May 2016

The Ideal Web Experience, Dion Almaer:

We aren’t yet at the ideal web experience, but I think that we are at least poised better with the technology and thinking around progressive web apps. It is all well and good to expect every development team behind a website to be craftsmen with infinite time to build the perfect experience, but the world isn’t like that. There are a slew of problems, a ton of legacy, and piles of work to do. All we can hope for is that this work is prioritized. —

26 May 2016

DRAMA!

@slightlylate, Alex Russel:

@dalmaer @xeenon @adactio @owencm: if you think the URL is going to get killed on my watch then you aren't paying any attention whatsoever.

27 May 2016

Beyond Progressive Web Apps, Matthias Beitl:

This is where things collide with existing functionality. Swiping from the top is already tied to the OS, not the current app. Well, this is how things are today, we can find ways to make it work. Not just for URLs, who says there is no common ground for a slide-from-top menu that works for both apps and URLs. All implementation details aside, browsers can only go so far, the operating system must be designed to take care of those needs.

28 May 2016

State of the gap, Remy Sharp:

With time, and persistence, users (us included) will come to expect PWAs to work. If it's on my homescreen, it'll work. The same way as any good native app might work today.

30 May 2016

Regression toward being mean, Jeremy Keith:

Simply put, in this instance, I don’t think good intentions are enough.

Not The Post I Wanted To Be Writing…, Alex Russel:

This matters because URL sharing is the proto-social behavior. It’s what enabled the web to spread and prosper, and it’s something we take for granted. In fact, if you look at any of my talks, you’ll see that I call it out as the web’s superpower.

31 May 2016

Progressive Web Apps and our regressive approach, Christian Heilmann:

The idea that a PWA is progressively enhanced and means that it could be a web site that only converts in the right environment is wonderful. We can totally do that. But we shouldn’t pretend that this is the world we need to worry about right now. We can do that once we solved the issue of web users not wanting to pay for anything and show growth numbers on the desktop. For now, PWAs need to be the solution for the next mobile users. And this is where we have an advantage over native apps. Let’s use that one.

1 June 2016

You got to love the new Web… Pouah! This is the URL of an article in the PWA environment. Yuck!

https://www.washingtonpost.com/pwa/#https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2016/05/27/newspapers-escalate-their-fight-against-ad-blockers/

I guess it's why they want to hide it.

Otsukare!

otsukare by Karl Dubost at

Last week-end, I went to see the work of a forest company in Kanagawa mountains from cutting down the trees, to manage the forest resources, to distribute them on the market. Sustainability is key for small structures. To achieve the sustainibility, you need to take care of the health of the ecosystem. I relate that a lot to the Web ecosystem and its zillion of small Web agencies versus big companies such as Facebook, Google, etc. Some needs to the Web to be sustainable, the others have the power to wipe out the entire landscape to replace the Web with something for their own needs. Web standards are keys for the Web ecosystem. Not caring for them because it just works creates the troy horse for big companies.

Tune of the week: 殯の森

Webcompat Life

Progress this week:

Today: 2016-05-30T07:35:11.615533
355 open issues
----------------------
needsinfo       4
needsdiagnosis  111
needscontact    29
contactready    43
sitewait        154
----------------------

You are welcome to participate

London agenda.

I wrote a couple of blog posts

The CSS rounding issue was interesting for me, because it helps me to dive in a place which is outside my comfort zone, aka the C++ code of Gecko. I have tried to fix a couple of issues here and there in the past, but nothing really too dangerous. Each time I ventured through the code, I always wondered where is this documented, things like the 1/60 for the CSS width that I explained this week. Maybe it's not necessary. But I have the feeling it would help beginners. Or maybe these are things that should be documented in the source code. Not sure.

Webcompat issues

(a selection of some of the bugs worked on this week).

  • strange issue on Chromium blog where some images appear and some don't. Still investigating.
  • Found another instance of SVG Filter on image fail. Currently if there is a mistake in the filter, the image is not displayed in Firefox but is displayed in Safari.
  • A lot of false bug reports this week.

WebCompat.com dev

Reading List

Follow Your Nose

TODO

  • Document how to write tests on webcompat.com using test fixtures.
  • ToWrite: Amazon prefetching resources with <object> for Firefox only.

Otsukare!

otsukare by Karl Dubost at

Last week-end, I went to see the work of a forest company in Kanagawa mountains from cutting down the trees, to manage the forest resources, to distribute them on the market. Sustainability is key for small structures. To achieve the sustainibility, you need to take care of the health of the ecosystem. I relate that a lot to the Web ecosystem and its zillion of small Web agencies versus big companies such as Facebook, Google, etc. Some needs to the Web to be sustainable, the others have the power to wipe out the entire landscape to replace the Web with something for their own needs. Web standards are keys for the Web ecosystem. Not caring for them because it just works creates the troy horse for big companies.

Tune of the week: 殯の森

Webcompat Life

Progress this week:

Today: 2016-05-30T07:35:11.615533
355 open issues
----------------------
needsinfo       4
needsdiagnosis  111
needscontact    29
contactready    43
sitewait        154
----------------------

You are welcome to participate

London agenda.

I wrote a couple of blog posts

The CSS rounding issue was interesting for me, because it helps me to dive in a place which is outside my comfort zone, aka the C++ code of Gecko. I have tried to fix a couple of issues here and there in the past, but nothing really too dangerous. Each time I ventured through the code, I always wondered where is this documented, things like the 1/60 for the CSS width that I explained this week. Maybe it's not necessary. But I have the feeling it would help beginners. Or maybe these are things that should be documented in the source code. Not sure.

Webcompat issues

(a selection of some of the bugs worked on this week).

  • strange issue on Chromium blog where some images appear and some don't. Still investigating.
  • Found another instance of SVG Filter on image fail. Currently if there is a mistake in the filter, the image is not displayed in Firefox but is displayed in Safari.
  • A lot of false bug reports this week.

WebCompat.com dev

Reading List

Follow Your Nose

TODO

  • Document how to write tests on webcompat.com using test fixtures.
  • ToWrite: Amazon prefetching resources with <object> for Firefox only.

Otsukare!

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